For July 4th: A Way To Help Our Communities

I belong to a local group in my community of Roanoke, Virginia – the Roanoke Civility Project. In response to the toxic divisiveness we see across the country, our mission is to advocate in Roanoke for proven processes required for effective collaboration to solve complex problems. We believe that a renewed expectation for civil discourse in the public square could break the current cycle of polarization and lead to better outcomes. RCP is an all-volunteer organization, 100% grass roots, 100% non-partisan, with no legal structure. I want to encourage readers to consider taking steps in your communities to encourage constructive and civil discourse. Reach out to a diverse set of community leaders who have earned your respect. Show them what we’re doing to see if they would like to engage in efforts to overcome caustic divisiveness. As coaches, you have important skills to contribute to this effort. Our group composed…

Using EQ to Deal with Different Views

These days, it seems we are often called upon to deal with people whose beliefs may be in strong opposition to ours. A colleague working within a large university-based medical center asked me for a blog piece dealing with this challenge. Like every medical center in the world today, hers is struggling with COVID. Not only because of the overwhelming number of cases their center has to deal with, but also because so many colleagues and patients have differing ideas about COVID, based on different sources of information deemed acceptable to their way of thinking. Pretty much everybody thinks their way of thinking is right, and other people’s views are ridiculous. What to do? Step One – Acceptance of the person, and of our shared human frailty: Approximately 100% of human beings have some beliefs that turn out to be accurate, and other beliefs? Not so much. Humility is a…